Featured Resources

Featured Member: Kevin Krane

N. Kevin Krane, MD, Professor of Medicine, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs
Tulane University School of Medicine
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Discipline: Nephrology

TBL Experience: I have been involved in TBL at many levels including presenting faculty development workshops, hosting the TBLC in New Orleans in 2010, and in my role as the academic dean, promoting the implementation of TBL in the curriculum at Tulane and other health care institutions. I like to emphasize how TBL addresses most of the competency domains we are expecting of our medical students. Currently I use TBL to teach kidney diseases to both first and second year medical students.

Mentoring Experiences: I have been using TBL for the last 7-8 years, serving as a TBL mentor for most of that time. I have provided “TBL 101” workshops at a number of other medical and allied health schools, and for TBLC pre-conference workshops.

Interesting: One of the most interesting and fun experiences I have had with TBL was providing TBL 101 workshops to faculty from the National University of Rwanda. Just like TBL students everywhere, they would “high-five” each other for correct answers on the IF-AT card!

Adaptions: I like using TBL principles to teach any topic. For example, we have incorporated group application exercises into patient safety training with TeamSTEPPS. in our courses at Tulane.

Research: With other colleagues, we have used TBL to generate scholarly work from our activities in TBL that has resulted in several poster presentations at medical education meetings including one demonstrating improved learning for lower quartile students using TBL and a published TBL Module on MedEdPortal.

How has the TBLC assisted me?: An essential aspect of effective educators is always growing through professional development. The TBLC provides an outstanding opportunity to learn new skills, enhance existing ones, and develop scholarly projects. But more importantly, the TBLC provides a community of colleagues who are interested in enhancing learning at every level of education and are excited about sharing and collaborating with all members.

 

TBLC – Featured Module: Personality Disorders

This month’s featured module is “Personality Disorders”. The module was developed by Dr. Ruth Levine, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Fall of 2015. The “Personality Disorders” module was designed for a third year psychiatry clerkship with teams of 4-6 students in a classroom of 20-24 medical students.

The module focuses on three learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. To be able to differentiate between the personality disorders.
  2. To be able to name and apply the most appropriate strategies for managing patients who experience interpersonal difficulties.
  3. To be able to describe the importance of establishing firm but compassionate limits when working with patients with personality disorders.

The “Personality Disorders” module includes a 13 question RAT and 2 Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: Cellular Membranes and Membrane Transporters

This month’s featured module is Cellular Membranes and Membrane Transporters. The Module was developed by Dr. Ruth Vinall, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Fall of 2016. The Cellular Membranes and Membrane Transporters module was designed for a course in a Biochemistry and Cell & Molecular Biology course. The is a foundational course that is taught to an average of 120 pharmacy students during the first year/first semester of their 4 year PharmD program. The majority of students are bio majors. This is one of 23 TBL modules in a one semester 5 unit course.

The Module focuses on five learning goals. The Learning Goals are:

  • Describe the key differences in structure and function of transporters, ion channels, and aquaporins.
  • Explain why transporters and ion channels are essential for cell function and survival.
  • Compare and contrast the properties of different types of membrane transporters and how this impacts function.
  • Discuss how dysfunction of membrane transporters can result in diseases and disorders.
  • Utilize knowledge of membrane transporters to select appropriate therapeutic targets and interventions.

The Cellular Membranes and Membrane Transporters module includes a seven question RAT and one three-part Application Exercise.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Featured Member: Parto Khansari

Parto Khansari
Associate Professor and Chair
California Northstate University
College of Pharmacy
Phone: (916)686-8549
pkhansari@cnsu.edu

Discipline: Pharmacology/Neuropharmacology

My TBL Experience: I began using TBL in 2009. I am actively involved in cultivating TBL delivery in pharmacy education, mentored over 10 faculty members to implement TBL at CNUCOP and through TBLC Consultant training, and have conducted several workshops at national and local conferences on implementing TBL.

Improvement in TBL: To enrich the review sessions and apply the principles of TBL, my colleague, Dr. Leanne Coyne, and I introduced the addition of team exam review. These team exams have a similar format to individual midterm exams, with the exception that answering the questions is a team effort. In a research study, we explored students’ perceptions of the benefits of having team exams prior to major exams. The findings of the study confirms that students believed team exams help them to identify class content that is challenging to them, recognize gaps in their knowledge, and strengthen their skills through discussion and debate with their team.

Citation: Khansari P and Coyne L. An Innovative Approach to Enhance Learning & Teaching by Incorporating Team-Exams into Team-Based-Learning. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2014; 78 (5) Article 111.

How has the TBLC assisted me?: The landscape of effective teaching is changing rapidly. The educational process is no longer a transfer of information; rather, an active engagement of students to acquire, evaluate and apply knowledge. The shift in transforming the educational process requires skill, well-thought infrastructure and support from other educators. The Team-Based Learning Collaborative is just the place where innovation is encouraged, best practice is shared and support is offered unconditionally. I joined the TBLC in 2009 and became TBL Trainer Certified in 2014 and I believe this is undoubtedly, was one of the most enriched decision I made in my career.

TBL Presentations:

  1. Khansari P, Coyne L. TBL 101 and Creating an Effective TBL Module, San Francisco, CA (2016)
  2. Khansari PS, Create effective TBL modules, CNU Elk Grove, August 31, 2016.
  3. McDowell, JA Jr., PS Khansari, G Kubat, T Ho, C Porter-Fraser, RM Alajajian, H Yang, T-J M Kreys, JK Cusick, CT Doan, A Nauli, K Hassell, S Clark, HT Tran. Plussing the Interview Day with an Authentic Team-Based Learning Experience at a College of Pharmacy. AACP Annual Meeting 23 June 2016.
  4. Khansari P, Coyne L, Frausto S, McClendon K. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education. AACP Annual Meeting, Chicago, July 2013
  5. Vinall, R., Khansari, P., Ofstad, W., and Clark, S. Methods to foster individual engagement, intrinsic motivation, and accountability to enhance team-based learning. 2016. Annual TBLC conference. Albuquerque, NM.
  6. Khansari P, Coyne L, Ofstad W, Building an Assessment Framework for a TBL Classroom. 2015. Annual TBLC conference. Podium presentation, St. Petersburg, FL.
  7. Khansari P, Coyne L, Ofstad W, An Introduction to Teaching and Assessment in A Team-Based Setting, Sacramento State Nursing School (2014)
  8. Khansari P, Coyne L, Ofstad W, Pathways to Expand the Effectiveness of Teaching and Learning, California Northstate University (2014)

TBLC – Featured Module: Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping

This month’s featured module is Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping (IABP). The Module was developed by Dr. Judy Currey, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Fall of 2015. The Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping module was designed for a course in Master of Nursing Practice (Intensive Care, Cardiac Care, Emergency Care, Critical Care).

The Module focuses on six learning goals. The Learning Goals are:

  1. perform a safety check of the IABP machine to ensure correct functioning;
  2. discuss the indications and contraindications for IABP therapy;
  3. explain principles and physiological effects of IABP therapy;
  4. rationalise and evaluate the nursing management of a patient with an IABP insitu with reference to:
    • systemic assessment of patient
    • prevention and detection of systemic and local complications
    • alarm troubleshooting
    • timing:
      • establishment
      • difference between r wave deflate (real timing) and conventional
      • recognition of correct timing and timing errors
    • weaning from therapy
    • removal of balloon
    • transport of patient
    • care of the catheter, tubing and machine;
  5. describe and evaluate the normal balloon pressure waveform morphology;
  6. interpret tracings of a concurrent cardiac rhythm strip and arterial blood pressure waveform in order to determine timing of the IABP in the cardiac cycle and any potential haemodynamic benefits or complications, with particular reference to:
    • correct timing morphology
    • timing errors of late inflation, late deflation, early inflation and early deflation
    • identification of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 IABP support

The Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping module includes an eight question RAT and two Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: The Manager’s Job

This month’s featured module is The Manager’s Job. The Module was developed by Dr. Mark Harrison, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Winter of 2017. The Manager’s Job module was designed for a course in Management at a liberal arts college. The primary focus is on critical thinking and communication skills, which have priority over technical knowledge and skills. The course serves as part of a broader effort to do Writing Across the Curriculum. This module is traditionally taught in small sections of 15 – 20 students of traditional age. These students have negligible prior exposure to Management, but they have read Harrison (2012) Note on Decision Cases Situation Analysis.

The Module focuses on three learning goals. The Learning Goals are:

  • Think critically and analytically; communicate clearly (both orally and in writing)
  • Apply managerial theories to realistic business situations; specifically, to apply Mintzberg’s ‘ten roles of a manager’ to the situation of Jessica Gonon in the case “Mommy-Track Backlash”.
  • Perform a situation analysis on a realistic management situation and make a reasoned recommendation for a course of action.

The Manager’s Job module includes a nine question RAT and two Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: Exploring Potential New Treatments For Alzheimer’s Disease

This month’s featured module is the Exploring Potential New Treatments For Alzheimer’s Disease module. The Module was developed by Dr. Leanne Coyne, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Winter of 2014. The Exploring Potential New Treatments For Alzheimer’s Disease module was used in a neuropharmacology course to introduce students to the challenges in treating Alzheimer’s disease. This course is taught to pharmacy students in their second semester of pharmacy school. All students have a bachelor’s degree or equivalent and prior education in biology.

The Module focuses on three learning goals. The Learning Goals are:

  1. Explain what is currently known about the underlying pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease.
  2. Identify potential drug targets based upon our current understanding of Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology.
  3. Predict systemic effects that may occur if a potential drug target is modulated.

The Exploring Potential New Treatments For Alzheimer’s Disease module includes a five question RAT and three Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site or you can click here to join the TBLC today.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Featured Member – Patricia Gwirtz

Field of Instruction: Physiology
Type of Institution: Health Science Center, graduate level instruction
Location: University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Texas

My TBL Experience: I have attended several workshops and conferences to gain knowledge about Team Based Learning and how to implement Team Based Learning into my teaching. Dr. Wayne McCormack first visited the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth in 2011. After his workshop, I had the pleasure of going to dinner with him and learn more about Team Based Learning (TBL). I have been attending the Annual TBL Conferences since then. I took the lead at our institution in helping other faculty learn about TBL technique, how to write TBLs, and how to use them in the classroom. Most of the faculty was skeptical and since I do not mind being the first to try out new teaching methods, I was the first faculty at UNTHSC to use TBL in medical school classroom (student size of 230). Many other faculty attended just to see how it can be done with such a large class because they just knew it was going to be a failure, especially with such a large class. It was a great success. We have been using TBLs in our classrooms ever since. The medical school has modified them and calls them Team Learning Modules. I have created several TBLs that have been used in our graduate physiology course (there will be 7 TBLs in the course this spring) and for a physiology course I teach to physical therapy students.

Mentoring Experiences: Since 2014 I have been invited to conduct TBL workshops and to mentor faculty on incorporating TBLs into the teaching programs. I have presented workshops several time to the faculty here at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Texas. I was honored to present three workshops to the faculty and administration at Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry in Moscow, Russia (Department of Pathophysiology and the entire faculty and administration), University of Puerto Rico at Cayey, St. Mary’s University in San Antonio School of Science, Engineering and Technology), Texas, and Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas (along with Dr. Ruth Levine – I think I learned more from her than I contributed). I have been advising and mentoring several faculty at the University of North Texas Health Science Center and I also work with a faculty member at Moscow State University by helping her develop her TBLs for a pathophysiology course. This has proven to be an interesting and rewarding experience. The TBLs I developed must be translated into Russian and that can prove to be amusing at times.

Research: Incorporating TBLs into the graduate physiology course was an important component of the Quality Enhancement Program for accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. I am in the process of analyzing data examining the improvement in higher order thinking skills of our student and the role TBLs played in any improvement. Once this data is completed, it will be written up for publication.

Featured Member – Ed McKee

Discipline: Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, Medical Genetics

Institution: College of Medicine, Central Michigan University
Mt Pleasant, MI 48859, USA

TBL Experience: I was recruited to the recently formed College of Medicine at Central Michigan University as the Founding Chair of Foundational Sciences. I now serve as Senior Associate Dean – Research, and Professor of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics. Prior to this appointment, I directed and taught courses in medical biochemistry and molecular biology as well as medical genetics at Indiana University School of Medicine – South Bend. I developed and used Team Based Learning extensively in these courses from 2006-2011. I moved to Central Michigan University in 2011 and have worked here to incorporate TBL into an innovative and integrated curriculum. I have been active in the Team-Based Learning collaborative since 2007 serving as treasurer 2012-2016, and as a member of the Executive committee from 2010-2016. I have also served as treasurer and past Vice-President and a member of the Executive Committee of the Association of Biochemistry Educators (2009-2015), (ABE), a group dedicated to supporting and enhancing the teaching of Biochemistry in medical, dental, and pharmacy schools. I have given workshops on Team-Based learning for the TBLC “Train the Trainers” Program and at National and International meetings as well as at Universities and Medical Schools.

Mentoring experience:

Years of TBL Teaching: 11

I have mentored several medical school basic science faculty in the TBLC Train the Trainers program and have served informally by providing TBL modules and mentoring to many faculty, mostly in medical science education who are interested in using TBL, especially to teach biochemistry and medical genetics. I have been closely involved in mentoring faculty at my present institution in TBL.

Adaptions: We have developed a technique at Central Michigan University College of Medicine in which Case-based learning is used as pre-work for the TBL, which it turn serves as an assessment of the Case-based learning. We have submitted one of these to MedEdPortal for review.

Research: I have not conducted any research in TBL, but have published four TBL modules in MedEdPortal.

Assisting members as a TBL-Trainer:

  1. I have experience in providing workshops on many aspects of TBL; including, TBL 101, Designing Modules, Peer Evaluation, and Facilitation.
  2. I have specific experience in developing and sharing modules in Medical Biochemistry and Medical Genetics and have given workshops and mentored faculty in these disciplines using these modules as examples.
  3. I have more recently gained experience at a new medical school in developing TBL modules in an integrated medical school curriculum, in which faculty from different disciplines work together to develop TBL modules, many of which are coupled with Case-Based Learning.

How has the TBLC assisted me?

I became interested in TBL in 2004 and received my initial exposure by visiting Wright State Boonshoft School of Medicine and becoming a member of a student team in Dr. Paul Koles’ pathology class. This was a wonderful experience and got me started. However, it was membership in TBLC and attendance at subsequent TBLC meetings that aided me greatly in filling in important details. Here I learned the importance of peer evaluation and how to design peer evaluation instruments. Here I learned to improve my facilitation skills, and how to mentor other faculty in improving their facilitation skills. Lastly, membership in the TBLC and attendance at meetings provide an important outlet for educational scholarship and an opportunity to develop networks of support.

TBLC – March Featured Resource

This month’s featured module is the Personality in Sport and Exercise module. The Module was developed by Dr. Karla Kubtiz, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Fall of 2015. The Personality in Sport and Exercise module was designed for an undergraduate course for students majoring in Physical Education/Teacher
Education, Athletic Training, and/or Sport Management as well as a free elective for all students.

The Module focuses on four learning goals. The Learning Goals are:

  1. Identify the dimensions, the levels, and the personality characteristics of the Martens model of personality.
  2. Classify statements illustrating various personality characteristics (i.e., beliefs, personality traits, and personality states) according to their levels in the Martens model of personality.
  3. Decide which of several sentences in a case study best illustrates a selected personality characteristic in the Martens model of personality.
  4. Use correlational data to decide which of several personality characteristics in the Martens model of personality would be the most problematic/most important to change.

The Personality in Sport and Exercise module includes a five question RAT and three Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.