Featured Resources

Want to improve TBL in your classroom? Get Certified!

The TBLC now offers a 3-tiered certification process for educators:

(1) Fundamentals, (2) Practitioner, and (3) Trainer-Consultant. These are described below. Further information is available at www.teambasedlearning.org and clicking on Resources.

Fundamentals

To obtain the Fundamentals Certification, educators must attend five (5) workshops that are essential to laying the foundation for applying a team-based learning strategy.

Practitioner

The Practitioner Certification is designed for those who are skilled in the development of TBL modules and experienced in facilitation using the TBL strategy.

Trainer-Consultant

The Trainer-Consultant Certification is designed for members of the TBLC who have achieved practitioner certification and are now actively mentoring others to develop their own TBL modules.

Featured Module – Global Health Microbiology

Global Health Microbiology

Authors: Christopher Burns, PhD and Joanna Shisler, PhD

This team-based learning (TBL) module addresses basic strategies to control or eliminate infectious disease, focusing on parasites as the main example. Students develop an understanding of parasite life-cycles in the context of solving real-world problems in global health. This includes basic knowledge about the disease, characteristics, habitat and transmission, pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, prevention, life cycle and any hosts or vectors, number and location of infected population, and eradication or control strategies.

An emphasis on neglected tropical diseases provides complex problems with regional and societal facets, and economic and political challenges, in addition to basic and clinical science content. Application exercise problems address major factors in disease elimination including vaccination, physical barriers, targeting vectors, effectiveness of treatment, role of different hosts, and detection of infected individuals.

Organisms/diseases covered include Plasmodium (malaria), Dracunculus (Guinea worm), Onchocerca (river blindness), Wuchereria (lymphatic filarisis), and poliovirus (polio), and touch on measles and smallpox as examples of possible recurrence.


This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Have You Explored the Communities of Practice?

This month’s featured resource are the Communities of Practice, specifically the Research and Scholarship community. Find out how the TBLC can help you to develop your research knowledge, profile, and outputs through collaboration! This resource is an outcome of the very successful Research Development Day at the 2018 Annual Conference in San Diego. It includes an inventory of research projects submitted by members, specific research publication proposals, information about education research conferences, and a detailed account of the outputs of the Research Development Day.

Join this community, post your comments on the blogs that have already been set up, and suggest new blogs. You can access this community of practice here.

Did you know that you can submit your own module or resource to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Thank you,
TBLC Admin Team

Personality in Sport & Exercise – April’s Featured TBL Module

Featured Resource

This month’s featured module is the Personality in Sport and Exercise Module. The Module was developed by Karla Kubitz, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in 2015. This class is part of the undergraduate curriculum for students majoring in Physical Education/ Teacher Education, Athletic Training, and/ or Sport Management. It is also an elective class for any student in any major across campus. Students are typically junior or senior standing and have completed an introductory psychology class.

The Module focuses on four learning goals. The Learning Goals are:
• The students will identify the dimensions, the levels, and the personality characteristics of the Martens model of personality.
• The students will classify statements illustrating various personality characteristics (i.e., beliefs, personality traits, and personality states) according to their levels in the Martens model of personality.
• The students will decide which of several sentences in a case study best illustrates a selected personality characteristic in the Martens model of personality.
• The students will use correlational data to decide which of several personality characteristics in the Martens model of personality would be the most problematic/ most important to change.

The Personality in Sport and Exercise Module includes 5 personality module readiness assurance questions and 3 application exercises.


Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: Compounds and Stoichiometry

This month’s featured module is “Compounds and Stoichiometry.” The module was developed by Dr. Lorrie Comeford, reviewed, and published to the Resource Portal in the Summer of 2017. The “Compounds and Stoichiometry” module was designed for a course in General Chemistry I, which is the first chemistry course taken by chemistry and biology majors.

The module focuses on 11 learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. Identify and name ionic and molecular compounds
  2. Use the formula of a compound to calculate a molar mass
  3. Use molar mass to calculate the mass, number of moles, or number of molecules of a compound
  4. Identify reactants and products in a chemical reaction
  5. Balance a chemical equation
  6. Use a balanced chemical equation to find the relationship between the moles of reactants used and/or products produced (stoichiometry with moles)
  7. Use a balanced chemical to find the relationship between the mass of reactants used and/or products produced (stoichiometry with mass)
  8. Use a balanced chemical equation to identify the limiting reactant in terms of moles or mass
  9. Use a balanced chemical equation to find the moles of a product produced when one reactant is limiting
  10. Use a balanced chemical equation to find the mass of product produced when one reactant is limiting
  11. Solve quantitative problems using units

The “Compounds and Stoichiometry” module includes two, five question RATs and three Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Portal. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Portal? Click here to download the Resource Portal submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: Feedback, Reinforcement, and Intrinsic Motivation

This month’s featured module is “Feedback, Reinforcement, and Intrinsic Motivation.” The module was developed by Dr. Karla Kubitz, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Summer of 2016. The “Feedback, Reinforcement, and Intrinsic Motivation” module was designed for a course called Psychology of Sport. Psychology of Sport is a required class for undergraduates majoring in Physical Education/Teacher Education and Sport Management. It is also a possible free elective for students in any major across campus. Students are typically junior or senior standing and must have completed an introductory psychology class.

The module focuses on 15 learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. Distinguish the terms involved in stimulus response theory, including positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, punishment, response cost, shaping, extinction, backward chaining, and forward chaining.
  2. Recognize the guidelines for using positive reinforcement effectively.
  3. Recognize the common criticisms of punishment.
  4. Identify the purpose and the six components of the acronym TARGET.
  5. Describe the methods and the key findings of the Komaki & Barnet (1977) study.
  6. Distinguish terms involved in self-determination theory, including integrated regulation, identified regulation, introjected regulation, external regulation, and amotivation.
  7. Identify the location of the ‘threshold of autonomy’ on the continuum of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (i.e., the self-determination continuum).
  8. Interpret the model illustrating cognitive evaluation theory.
  9. Interpret the flow model.
  10. Compare and contrast stimulus response theory and self-determination theory.
  11. Apply cognitive evaluation theory.
  12. Apply the acronym TARGET to the situation in the movie, Miracle on Ice.
  13. Apply the flow model to the situation in the movie, Miracle on Ice.
  14. Apply stimulus response theory to the situation in the movie, Miracle on Ice.
  15. Apply self-determination theory to the situation in the movie, Miracle on Ice.

The “Feedback, Reinforcement, and Intrinsic Motivation” module includes a nine question RAT and one Application Exercise.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

TBLC – Featured Module: Strategic Management, Strategic Planning, and Strategic Analysis

This month’s featured module is “Strategic Management, Strategic Planning, and Strategic Analysis.” The module was developed by Annetta Dolowitz, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the fall of 2016. The “Strategic Management, Strategic Planning, and Strategic Analysis” module was designed for a course in Nonprofit Organizational Management.

The module focuses on seven learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. Demonstrate and apply experience and skills that you have read or heard in class activities, and in your service learning projects, while adding skills to your resume.
  2. Identify the theoretical and conceptual foundations of a nonprofit.
  3. Assess and explain how strategic management competencies are applied to nonprofit organizations by running a SWOT analysis.
  4. Take the results of your SWOT analysis to evaluate Class NPO Partner to develop and defend strategies to address your findings for the Class NPO Partner Project.
  5. Critique the role of accountability, ethics, and social responsibility in the management of a nonprofit organization.
  6. Evaluate, explain, and defend the results of your project for your partner NPO.
  7. Demonstrate professional development.

The “Strategic Management, Strategic Planning, and Strategic Analysis” module includes a 10 question RAT and 2 Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Featured Module: Drug Discovery and Classification

This month’s featured module is “Drug Discovery and Classification.” The module was developed by Dr. Michael Nelson, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the fall of 2015. The “Drug Discovery and Classification” module was designed as the first module for a class serving as an introduction to the basic and pharmaceutical sciences (physiology, pathophysiology, immunology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, medicinal chemistry) in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum.

The module focuses on 9 learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. Provide a definition for “drug” and “pharmacognosy”
  2. Describe characteristics used to classify drugs into drug families
  3. Distinguish between traditional small molecule drugs and macromolecule drugs
  4. Describe the differences among natural, semi-synthetic, and synthetic drugs
  5. Identify sources of drug discovery
  6. Describe methods by which drugs are discovered or designed
  7. Describe the difference between a generic and brand (trade) drug name
  8. When given two or more generic drug names, predict which drugs are within the same drug class
  9. Apply concepts of drug discovery and classification to describe a new drug entity

The “Drug Discovery and Classification” module includes a 5 question RAT and 1 Application Exercise.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.

Featured Member: Kevin Krane

N. Kevin Krane, MD, Professor of Medicine, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs
Tulane University School of Medicine
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Discipline: Nephrology

TBL Experience: I have been involved in TBL at many levels including presenting faculty development workshops, hosting the TBLC in New Orleans in 2010, and in my role as the academic dean, promoting the implementation of TBL in the curriculum at Tulane and other health care institutions. I like to emphasize how TBL addresses most of the competency domains we are expecting of our medical students. Currently I use TBL to teach kidney diseases to both first and second year medical students.

Mentoring Experiences: I have been using TBL for the last 7-8 years, serving as a TBL mentor for most of that time. I have provided “TBL 101” workshops at a number of other medical and allied health schools, and for TBLC pre-conference workshops.

Interesting: One of the most interesting and fun experiences I have had with TBL was providing TBL 101 workshops to faculty from the National University of Rwanda. Just like TBL students everywhere, they would “high-five” each other for correct answers on the IF-AT card!

Adaptions: I like using TBL principles to teach any topic. For example, we have incorporated group application exercises into patient safety training with TeamSTEPPS. in our courses at Tulane.

Research: With other colleagues, we have used TBL to generate scholarly work from our activities in TBL that has resulted in several poster presentations at medical education meetings including one demonstrating improved learning for lower quartile students using TBL and a published TBL Module on MedEdPortal.

How has the TBLC assisted me?: An essential aspect of effective educators is always growing through professional development. The TBLC provides an outstanding opportunity to learn new skills, enhance existing ones, and develop scholarly projects. But more importantly, the TBLC provides a community of colleagues who are interested in enhancing learning at every level of education and are excited about sharing and collaborating with all members.

 

TBLC – Featured Module: Personality Disorders

This month’s featured module is “Personality Disorders”. The module was developed by Dr. Ruth Levine, reviewed, and published to the Resource Bank in the Fall of 2015. The “Personality Disorders” module was designed for a third year psychiatry clerkship with teams of 4-6 students in a classroom of 20-24 medical students.

The module focuses on three learning goals. The learning goals are:

  1. To be able to differentiate between the personality disorders.
  2. To be able to name and apply the most appropriate strategies for managing patients who experience interpersonal difficulties.
  3. To be able to describe the importance of establishing firm but compassionate limits when working with patients with personality disorders.

The “Personality Disorders” module includes a 13 question RAT and 2 Application Exercises.

This module and many more can be found in the TBLC Resource Bank. Click here to log in to the Member’s Site.

Did you know that you can submit your own module to be peer reviewed by fellow TBLC members and included in the TBLC Resource Bank? Click here to download the Resource Bank submission form and e-mail it to resources@tblcadmin.org.