Featured Resources

TBLC Featured Resource Elements

Title: Elements
Authors: Lorrie Comeford
Affiliations: Salem State University
Resources available with this module: Readings
Context: General Chemistry I (Undergraduate)
This module is for General Chemistry I which is the first chemistry course taken by undergraduate chemistry and biology majors. It has been used with classes ranging in size from 35 to 40. This is the second TBL module in the course, and it typically takes three 90 minute periods to complete. Topics include: the periodic table, elements, ions, isotopes, molar mass and moles. 

Required Reading

Students are given the following reading guide for a chapter in their textbook. This module was used with Chemistry: A Molecular Approach by Nivaldo Tro (Tro, Nivaldo J. Chemistry: A Molecular Approach, 3rd ed.; Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2013.), but it could be adapted for any General Chemistry text. In the text by Tro, students read sections 2.5-2.9 which is about 20 pages. All reading assignments are posted at the beginning of the semester, and students have at least two days to complete the reading.

Objectives

  • Predict the reactivity and physical properties of the elements using the periodic table.
  • Determine the number of protons, neutrons and electrons for a given isotope.
  • Write the symbol for an isotope given the number of protons and neutrons.
  • Determine the number of protons and electrons for a given ion.
  • Use the periodic table to predict the charge on monatomic ions.
  • Identify the location of metals, nonmetals and metalloids.
  • Identify the location of main group elements and transition metals.
  • Name following groups: 1A, 2A, 7A, 8A.
  • Use the Avogadro constant to calculate moles or number of molecules.
  • Use the molar mass to calculate mass or number of moles.
  • Solve quantitative problems using units

For more information on this, and more, modules available in the Resource Bank, please visit the Resource Portal.

Will you be attending any Educational Conferences? Tell us!

We’d like to get the word out about Team-Based Learning and about the Collaborative. To do this, we need your help! 

Will you be attending any Education-Based Conferences this year? If you are, please let us know! You can send this information to us via email at support@tblcadmin.org

We’d like to begin exhibiting at these meetings and your information will help us expand our list of current meetings to attend. If you have any additional questions or concerns, please just let us know at support@tblcadmin.org.

ETBLC Events – June 2019

I write to provide details of a couple of events that are happening in June.

1. The European Team-Based Learning Community (ETBLC) is hosting a number of pre-conference workshops on Wednesday 26th June before a ‘Threshold Concepts in Action Conference’ on Thursday 27th June, both to be held at the University of Dundee in Scotland.

We’re offering the opportunity to attend two workshops on either a beginners pathway (if you’re new to TBL) or an advanced pathway (for more experienced TBL practitioners) all for a minimal cost of £50 each. Please click on the links above for further information.

If you are interested in booking onto the ‘Threshold Concepts in Action Conference’ on Thursday 27th June with Professor Ray Land as the keynote speaker then the link to book this is here.

Dr. Shihab Khogali, ETBLC Board member and Clinical Senior Lecturer in Medical Education at the University of Dundee can provide further details if necessary.

Please do circulate to your networks.

2. You may also be interested in attending the following event in Nottingham, England on Friday 28th June.

Active Collaborative Learning for Student Success
28th June 2019
Nottingham Trent University

We have interesting findings to share from our project for the OFS Addressing Barriers to Student Success programme. The project was led by Nottingham Trent University, in collaboration with Anglia Ruskin University and the University of Bradford. We investigated whether the use of active, collaborative learning at large scale can address progression and attainment gaps.

The news is good. We will share our findings and reflect on lessons learnt for adoption of SCALE-UP and Team-Based Learning at scale.

I hope you can join us on the day. You can book a place at: www.ntu.ac.uk/about-us/events/events/2019/06/scaling-up-active-collaborative-learning-for-student-success. If you have questions, please contact: loyin.olotuumoren@ntu.ac.uk.

3. Please do extend this invitation to colleagues, if you think they might be interested.If you have any TBL news from Europe that you’d like to be published in the next TBLC Newsletter please send me details by 15th May. This might include any conferences where you’ve presented on TBL, any visitors who are interested in TBL that you’ve hosted or any TBL research or scholarship publications you’ve had.

4. Finally, if you are interested in joining our ETBLC Board, please do let me know. We meet virtually, approximately monthly with an annual face-to-face meeting. You can find more information about our vision here and our board members here. We are particularly interested in hearing from European TBLC members outside the UK as we are keen to expand our membership and influence further into Europe.

Dr. Simon Tweddell
Chair, European Team-based Learning Community (2017-19)
s.j.tweddell@bradford.ac.uk

How to Obtain Your TBL Fundamentals Certificate After the Meeting

At the 2019 Annual Meeting in Tampa, TBLC offered the five workshops required for the Fundamentals Certificate. In order to receive the TBLC Fundamentals Certificate, you will need to have completed the 5 fundamentals workshops and filled out the application form here. You will receive your certificate when both the form and $25 payment have been received by the TBLC Administrative office.  If you weren’t aware of the Fundamentals workshops offered at the meeting or weren’t able to attend the sessions to complete your certificate, TBLC will be offering all five workshops at the 2020 Meeting in Portland, Oregon! This includes:

 • Fundamental Principles and Practices of TBL
• Creating an Effective TBL Module
• Evaluating Multiple Choice Questions for Readiness Assurance Tests and Application Activities
• Improving Facilitation Skills for a TBL Classroom
• Peer Feedback and Evaluation More information about the certificate and each of the workshops can be found on our website here.

Don’t Miss This Free Webinar! Getting Research Ideas With the Aim of Publication

There is still time to register for the first in a series of free webinars sponsored by the Team-Based Learning Collaborative, focusing on generating research ideas with an aim at getting that scholarly work published. Many who are teaching-focused would like to (or need to) publish papers, but may not have access to research data in a particular discipline. This TBLC Research and Scholarship webinar is the first in a series that features a wide range of research that members have published.

Title: Getting Research Ideas With the Aim of Publication
Presenter: Dr. Peter Balan, OAM
Time: Tuesday, April 23 at 12 PM ESTRegistration link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8190296598264358668 We hope you enjoy the first of what will surely be a successful series of webinars all focused on helping you do your best research and scholarship.

*Free TBLC Webinar* Getting Research Ideas With the Aim of Publication

Please join us in the first of a series in free webinars sponsored by the Team-Based Learning Collaborative, focusing on generating research ideas with an aim at getting that scholarly work published. Many who are teaching-focused would like to (or need to) publish papers, but may not have access to research data in a particular discipline. This TBLC Research and Scholarship webinar is the first in a series that features a wide range of research that members have published.

This inaugural webinar deals with what is possibly the hardest step in the research process, which is to find a workable research idea that draws on our classroom activities. This poses a challenge, because for most of us teaching/education is an unfamiliar discipline, and it may be hard to see how we can draw on our own “technical” discipline research experience for guidance.

Title: Getting Research Ideas With the Aim of Publication
Presenter: Dr. Peter Balan, OAM
Time: Tuesday, April 23 at 12 PM ESTRegistration link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8190296598264358668

Dr. Balan’s field of expertise is entrepreneurship and innovation, but he has built a research stream in education/pedagogy and has set up collaborative research projects with TBLC members in different countries. His view is that every time we walk into a classroom we should see the students in front of us as a potential dataset and that there are many possible research ideas that emerge out of our teaching, and out of reflecting on student attitudes and perceptions in general. 
Dr. Balan will talk through a practical approach for generating research ideas, and will use some of his current projects to bring to life the first steps in the research process, which is to identify a research idea and then to turn this into a research question that can be explored using data provided by your students.

Interested in viewing this free webinar? Register using this link. You will then be sent a URL that will connect you with the webinar. We hope you enjoy the first of what will surely be a successful series of webinars all focused on helping you do your best research and scholarship.
 Thank you,Richard Plunkett, PhD
Chair, TBLC Research and Scholarship Committee

TBLC Featured Resource Health Assessment: Pulling it all Together!

Title: Health Assessment: Pulling it all Together!
Authors: Pam Johnson
Affiliations: University of South Alabama
Resources available with this module: Readings, application exercise
Context: NU 325 Nursing Health Assessment
This TBL module is used as a culminating learning activity in an undergraduate nursing health assessment course. These students are in their first semester of nursing classes (Junior year). These students will be entering the clinical setting the following semester, so they must have a strong foundation in health assessment skills. This course is taught every semester and there are anywhere from 50 – 130 students enrolled. Throughout the semester, content is taught based on body system (Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Abdomen, etc.) This module was created in order to plunge students into application of knowledge gained throughout the semester to complex clinical scenarios.

Required Reading•   Read the article: Crowe, S., Ewart, L., Derman, S. (2017). Something isn’t right: The subtle changes of early deterioration. Nursing Made Incredibly Easy! DOI-10.1097/01.NME.0000508537.59047.b3•   Read p. 3, 4, 5 including Table 1-1; p. 804-805 SBAR in Textbook: Jarvis, C. (2016). Physical examination and health assessment (7th ed.). Philadelphia: Saunders•   Review the PowerPoint presentation on Vital Signs, and Evidence-Based Assessment•   Watch this Introduction to Team-Based Learning Video: http://camtasia.usouthal.edu/Camtasia/pamjohnson/Introduction_to_TBL_-_20170424_165259_16.html•   Review the Student Database Document and Student Guidelines Document
Objectives•   Determine what patient data is considered normal versus abnormal.•   Recognize signs of clinical deterioration in an unfolding patient case.•   Demonstrate effective communication skills using the SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation) tool to report patient deterioration to a healthcare provider.
 For more information on this, and more, modules available in the Resource Bank, please visit theResource Portal.

TBLC Featured Resource Bad Blends: An Introduction to Pharmacology

Title: Bad Blends: An Introduction to Pharmacology
Authors: Sarah Lerchenfeldt and Rodney Nyland
Affiliations: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
Resources available with this module: Readings, iRAT, application exercise and facilitator guide
Context: Biomedical Sciences Summer Program
The Bad Blends TBL was created for biomedical science high school summer programs. It has been used for three years and was completed in two different settings. In one setting, it was delivered in two ninety-minute sessions over a two-week period. In was also delivered as one two-hour session. The first session included an introduction to basic pharmacology. The second session was the actual TBL activity. In both cases there were 25-30 students split into 5-6 teams. The intent was to introduce students to the TBL instructional strategy, as well encourage their interest and curiosity in health sciences. 

Required Reading
The preparatory material (attached) is a content outline that contains necessary information that the students must know about pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The handout provides all necessary information to answer the RAT questions. The PowerPoint slides that review pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can also be used as part of the preparatory material. 

Version 1
If the opportunity for two separate sessions is provided, the students will have more time to research concepts and digest the material before taking part in the TBL. It also allows for additional information that students have found interesting (examples of computational modeling for drug design). 

Version 2
If the opportunity for one session is provided, the students will not have time to research concepts, although an introduction to basic pharmacology can still be provided.

Objectives

  • Explain how the body affects drugs (pharmacokinetics).
  • Explain how drugs affect the body (pharmacodynamics).
  • Evaluate potential drug-drug and drug-food interactions and their likely effect on the body.
  • Formulate recommendations for patients in which there is a concern for drug-drug or drug-food interactions.
  • Participate in the TBL activity in a professional and respect manner.

For more information on this, and more, modules available in the Resource Bank, please visit theResource Portal.

TBLC Featured Resource Lecture-Free Classroom Sessions

Title: Lecture-Free Classroom Sessions
Authors: Peter Balan, OAM, PhD
Affiliations: University of South Australia, Australia
Resources available with this module: Module User Manual, Excel spreadsheet for compiling evaluations of this teaching method, Implementing Class Tests PowerPoint Slides, Implementing Class Tests Slides (PDF Version)
Context: Entrepreneurship, creativity and commercialisation, but it can be applied in any discipline
This manual describes the way

that you can conduct classroom sessions that follow the classroom iRAT and tRAT tests. In other words, this approach is used in the classroom time that is normally used for “mini-lectures” and application exercises. This approach replaces the “mini-lecture” in a way that is based on the TBL principles and allows the whole classroom period to be conducted in a way that is faithful to these principles. 


Objectives
For the educator, this method provides:

  • A simple and flexible method for implementing a consistent TBL approach in the classroom in sessions for which students cannot reasonably pre-learn course content;
  • A delivery method that to a large extent removes time constraints. It allows the educator to spend time on sessions that require more attention, while being able to condense sessions where it is clear that students have come to grips with the content and its application.

For the student, this method provides:

  • A student-based learning approach that helps students to learn course content in a collaborative learning environment
  • Team activities that support and reinforce the development of good teamwork practice
    experience in speaking to a large group, where each student in a team contributes at the classroom level by reporting the deliberations of the team

For more information on this, and more, modules available in the Resource Bank, please visit theResource Portal.

TBL Workshop Support Kit

Are you going to be presenting a TBL workshop soon? Let us know!

If you’ll be leading a TBL workshop and you’d like some TBLC materials, please just let us know at support@tblcadmin.org. Please be sure to include:

  • Where the workshop will be held
  • How many attendees you expect
  • When the workshop will be held
  • Your shipping address

We’d be happy to provide you with some A-E cards, TBLC brochures, and TBLC meeting or regional workshop flyers!

Once the workshop is over, we ask that you forward us this sign in sheet that includes attendee’s names, institutions, and email addresses so that we may follow up with them.